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United Arab Emirates launches its first ever mission to Mars. Author Dorothy Koomson. Visiting care homes

Tomorrow the United Arab Emirates will launch its first ever mission to Mars. The probe, called Hope, aims to give the most complete picture yet of the Martian atmosphere – and will cement the UAE’s role as a space-exploring nation. We talk to Her Excellency Sarah Al-Miri Minister of State for Advanced Sciences and the Deputy Mission Project Manager for the Emirates Mars Mission and Professor Jim Al-Khalili, Theoretical physicist and presenter of The Life Scientific. Ghislaine Maxwell will appear in court in Manhattan on Tuesday charged with recruiting girls for Jeffrey Epstein to sexually abuse. She’s always denied any wrongdoing, and has also denied knowing that he was doing anything wrong. But if we looks back over the decades, news coverage of women accused of aiding and abetting men in their crimes, especially if sexual abuse is involved, has provoked some double-standard reactions. We hear from Baroness Helena Kennedy and Consultant Clinical & Forensic Psychologist Naomi Murphy Leading charities say relatives of care home residents with dementia should be treated as key workers. In a letter to the health secretary, they say that the care given by family members is "essential" to residents' mental and physical health. We hear from listener Sara McMahon about the impact not benig able to visit her dad has had on his condition. Plus Dorothy Koomson discusses her new novel All My Lies Are True, sequel to the bestselling The Ice Cream Girls, about two teenage girls accused of the murder of their teacher. Presenter Jane Garvey Producer Beverley Purcell Guest; Baroness Helena Kennedy Guest; Naomi Murphy Guest; Her Excellency Sarah Al-Miri Guest; Professor Jim Al-Khalili, Guest; Dorothy Koomson

The Cumberlege Review, Motherless daughters, Women in the video games industry

A highly-critical review of three medical treatments for women in the UK found thousands of lives had been harmed because officials failed to listen to safety worries and often dismissed them as "women's problems". The Cumberlege Review examined responses to concerns about a hormone pregnancy test, a drug for epilepsy, and vaginal mesh. We spoke to the BBC Health correspondent Anna Collinson, and to Baroness Cumberlege about her review. And we heard reaction from Clare Pelham, CEO of the Epilepsy Society, and Mary McLaughlin, who has campaigned for women affected by pelvic mesh in Ireland. The video games sector makes up more than half of the UK’s entire entertainment market. Women are 50% of those who play but the number of women working in the industry is much lower. Jordan Erica Webber, a video games expert, Katie Goode, who makes VR games, and Abbey Plumb, a producer for a games company discussed their experiences of working in the video games industry. It’s 1957 and Jean Swinney, a journalist on a local paper in the London suburbs, is investigating a story about a virgin birth. As she gets closer to the people involved Jean’s lonely and dutiful life becomes more interesting and she experiences a miracle of her own. Clare Chambers’ book ‘Small Pleasures’ is her first for 10 years and it was an item on Woman’s Hour which sparked the idea. After the death of her mother, Emma Winterschladen has gone through what she calls ‘missed mum moments’ including graduating university, her first job and more recently her engagement. How do motherless daughters navigate these big moments without their mothers? Freelance Editor, writer & illustrator Emma Winterschladen and psychologist Anjula Mutanda discuss. Twenty year old student Abigail McGourlay is the winner of The Arts Society’s national Isolation Artwork competition. She told us about her winning self-portrait 'Brewing'. Presenter: Jane Garvey Producer: Dianne McGregor

Olive Morris, Eileen Flynn, Women and Gaming

It's 41 years this Sunday that Olive Morris died. She was a Black British feminist and civil rights campaigner. A couple of weeks ago, Google marked what would have been her 68th birthday with a drawing of her on its header. So who was Olive Morris and who are some of the other Black British female activists from the past who we should know about? We talk to Angelina Osborne, a researcher and lecturer, and Olivette Otele who's a professor specialising in Black female history. Eileen Flynn is the first Traveller to be made a Senator in the Irish Parliament. The Irish PM, or Taoiseach, can nominate a handful of people to work in the Upper House and a couple of weeks ago Eileen was one of them. She says it’s an historic moment, especially for Travellers who are so marginalized and stigmatized in Irish society. She talks to us from her home in Donegal. All week we’ve been looking at women and gaming. We've explored how gaming has changed and how it can improve some people's mental health. The UK gaming industry is worth billions and the video games sector makes up more than half of the UK’s entire entertainment market. Women are 50% of those who play and those over 40 are among the fastest growing group of people that play on their smartphones. But the number of women working in the industry is much lower and today we hear from them. Photo Credit: Lambeth Council

Womb transplants; Goblin Market; Leslie Kern

One in 5,000 women are born without a womb and many may have to have it removed because of cancer or other conditions. In the past decade there’ve been significant advancements in the development of human uterine transplants – with 56 having taken place world wide – though none have yet been carried out in the UK. Jenni talks to Mr Richard Smith, clinical lead at the charity Womb Transplant UK about the progress we’re making in this country and to Dr Gulzaar Barn, Lecturer in Philosophy at the New College of the Humanities in London, about her concerns about the global market and the protection of vulnerable young women in countries where regulations and protections may not be as stringent as in the UK. We already know that many everyday objects and medicines are not designed with women in mind, but what about our cities? Author of Feminist City Leslie Kern joins Jenni to talk about what an inclusive city might look like: one that puts friendship, pushchairs and more public toilets above skyscrapers and statues. Leslie is Associate Professor of Geography and Environment and Director of Women’s and Gender Studies at Mount Allison University, Canada. A new dramatization of the poem Goblin Market will be broadcast this Saturday 11 July on Radio 4. Woven into the recording are the testimonies of sisters whose real lives have been caught up in cycles of addiction. We hear from one of the pairs of sisters - Georgie and Sam Adams. Sam spent five years on heroin and spice and ended up homeless in Wrexham in Wales, but she has since recovered. Georgie has been working with health professionals and rehabilitation services to find a new model of helping people in Wrexham. She joins Jenni to discuss the effects of long term addiction on families, along with Chris Bermingham, a Service Manager from the charity We Are With You (formerly AdAction) in East Ayrshire in Scotland. Presented by Jenni Murray Produced by Sarah Crawley Interviewed guest: Richard Smith Interviewed guest: Gulzaar Barn Interviewed guest: Leslie Ke

Cumberlege Review Reaction; Leaving School Rituals; Motherless daughters

The Independent Medicines and Medical Devices Safety review has been released this morning. Baroness Cumberlege led the review into the the effects of vaginal mesh, the hormonal pregnancy test Primodos and the epilepsy drug Sodium Valproate. She discusses its recommendations and her experience of hearing so many moving testimonies from women across the UK. Jenni also hears some initial reaction from Mary McLaughlin, who has campaigned for women affected by pelvic mesh in Ireland, and Clare Pelham, the CEO of the Epilepsy Society who gave evidence to the review about the effects of sodium valproate. School leaving rituals – the sweatshirts, the prom, the signed T-shirts, the school trip and primary school final assembly. How important are they and what impact has the Coronavirus pandemic had on this year’s leavers? Jenni speaks to Juliet Benis, Head Teacher at Ambler Primary School and to A' level student Anna from Bacon's College. Motherless daughters can experience persistent grief for years which peaks during milestones. After the death of her mother Emma Winterschladen has gone through what she calls ‘missed mum moments’ including graduating university, her first job and more recently her engagement. How do motherless daughters navigate these big moments without their mothers? Freelance Editor, writer & illustrator Emma Winterschladen and psychologist Anjula Mutanda discuss the relationship between grief and joy. Presenter: Jenni Murray Producer: Caroline Donne Interviewed guest: Baroness Cumberlege Interviewed guest: Mary McLaughlin Interviewed guest: Clare Pelham Interviewed guest: Juliet Benis Interviewed guest: Emma Winterschladen Interviewed guest: Anjula Mutanda

The Cumberlege Review. How has the healthcare system responded to concerns raised by women?

The Independent Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Review, also known as the Cumberlege review, is finally being published tomorrow after being delayed by Covid-19. It will focus on three health scandals that have severely affected women’s lives including vaginal mesh implants, an oral pregnancy test called Primodos, and an anti-epileptic drug called sodium valproate. The precise medical details between the cases differ, but what they all have in common is that women were given medical products that weren’t properly tested, and then weren’t believed when they complained of side effects further down the line. BBC Health Correspondent Anna Collinson talks about the background to the cases and the review, and Bonita Barrett discusses her experience of seeking help – and being ignored – when she went to her doctor in pain after being given a mesh implant without her consent. It’s 1957 and Jean Swinney, a journalist on a local paper in the London suburbs, is investigating a story about a virgin birth. As she gets closer to the people involved Jean’s lonely and dutiful life becomes more interesting and she experiences a miracle of her own. Clare Chambers’ book ‘Small Pleasures’ is her first for 10 years and it was an item on Woman’s Hour which sparked the idea. There is a concern that some children and pregnant women have missed routine vaccinations in England during the Coronavirus pandemic. Professor Sonia Saxena from Imperial College, London explains why this must be reversed quickly. Jane speaks to the winner of the Winner of The Arts Society’s national Isolation Artwork Competition in support of young artists during lockdown. Presenter: Jane Garvey Producer: Caroline Donne Interviewed guest: Anna Collinson Interviewed guest: Bonita Barrett Interviewed

Ivana Bartoletti, HPV, STEM Winners

“Gendered power dynamics underpin the AI debate,” says Ivana Bartoletti. She’s an expert in data privacy and has set up a network called, Women Leading in AI. Ivana believes AI is linked to inequality and oppression. She talks to us about getting more women into coding, our addiction to being online and female cyborgs like Alexa and Siri. Why is the issue of HPV only discussed in relation to younger people? That's a question put by Helen, one of our listeners. The HPV vaccine is currently given to girls and boys in the UK, but would it help if older women got it too? We chat to Helen, as well as Imogen Pinnell from Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust. The Domestic Abuse Bill 2020 is having its third reading today in the House of Commons. It's taken two years to get to this point. Today we talk to Harriet Wistrich, Director of the Centre for Women’s Justice. She talks to Jane about the Bill’s significance, but more specifically about women prisoners who've offended partly because they've been victims of domestic abuse. She wants a further amendment to be added to the Bill which would give them legal protection. We also hear from Gisela Valle, Director of the Latin American Women’s Rights Service. And we meet Evie Mackenzie. She's part of a winning school-team, who've discovered a way to cut down on plastic waste. It involves mealworms! We chat to Evie and her teacher Thandiwe Banda.

Skin lightening creams, the film Lynn and Lucy & Panama's sex segregated lockdown

The Domestic Abuse Bill 2020 is currently making its way through Parliament, and will reach the House of Lords by the end of July. For the first time there will be a statutory definition of domestic abuse. The Centre for Women’s Justice is asking for an amendment to the Bill, to create a free-standing offence of non-fatal strangulation or asphyxiation. We hear from Sandra who was strangled by a former partner and from Nicole Jacobs, the first domestic abuse commissioner for England and Wales, on why she too is calling for this amendment. We discuss the popularity of the skin lightening industry, despite the dangers and controversy? We hear from Nimmi Dosanjh who is Indian-Kenyan and light-skinned. Her 11 year old daughter is dark-skinned, from Linasha Kotalawala who is a beauty and lifestyle blogger and from Geeta Pandey the Editor of BBC News Online India Women and Social Affairs. The actor Roxanne Scrimshaw tells us about the new film Lynn and Lucy about the lives of two best friends in a close-knit community in Essex whose relationship is tested after a tragedy happens A new government report in Ireland shows that 6,666 women accessed abortions there in 2019. This is the first annual report to be published since medical abortion on demand became legal in Ireland up to twelve weeks of pregnancy What do the figures tell us about abortion care in Ireland now? We hear from Ellen Coyne, a journalist at the Irish Independent newspaper and Dr Trish Horgan, a GP in Cork City and member of START - Southern Taskgroup on Abortion and Reproductive Topics. We hear from Dawn Bilbrough the critical care nurse from York who in the early stages of COVID-19 posted an emotional video on social media that went viral. She was appealing to the public to stop panic buying as she was unable to get the basics in her supermarket after her shift ended. She tells us about the impact of the video and what it has been like working on the frontline. Brit Bennett’s new novel, The Vanishing Half tells the story of twin sisters

Fussy eaters, Parliament that works for women, Passing for white, Terri White - editor-in-chief Empire magazine

What do you do when your toddler is a fussy eater? A guide for parents about fussy eating which has been available for over ten years, has just been re-evaluated by 25 mothers. Jenni hears from Amanda, a mother of two daughters, plus one of the academics behind the guide, Claire Farrow, Professor in Children's Eating Behaviour at Aston University, Birmingham. The system of proxy voting for MPs on baby leave is due to expire this summer. Last year, Andrea Leadsom, then Leader of the House of Commons, announced that MPs could take baby leave. Men would get two weeks and women would get six months and they can, if they choose, vote by proxy. So, what is likely to happen now? And what can be done to prevent gender equality in Parliament from being seen as a luxury add-on as the country faces the current health and economic challenges of Covid-19? We hear from Andrea Leadsom MP and Sarah Childs, Professor of Politics and Gender at Royal Holloway, University of London. To everyone else, Terri White appeared to be living the dream. In her thirties, she moved from the UK to New York to edit magazines and went on to become one of Folio's Top Women in US Media. In reality, she was rapidly sliding towards a mental health crisis that would land her in a locked psychiatric ward as her past caught up with her. The now editor-in-chief of Empire magazine describes her time in New York and her traumatic childhood of physical and sexual abuse in a new memoir, 'Coming Undone'. We speak to Dr Janine Bradbury, Senior Lecturer in Literature at York St John University, about the history of 'passing for white' novels and films, many of which offer deeply problematic representations of mixed race women. Books mentioned by Dr Bradbury: The House Behind the Cedars by Charles Chestnutt, Passing by Nella Larsen, Caucasia by Danzy Senna, The Vanishing Half by Britt Bennett Presenter: Jenni Murray Producer: Dianne McGregor

The film Lynn and Lucy; The Double X Economy; Gender Bias at Work and Domestic Abuse Bill.

Lynn and Lucy is a new film about the lives of two best friends in a close-knit community in Essex whose relationship is tested after a tragedy happens. It stars Nichola Burley and Roxanne Scrimshaw in her first acting role. Roxanne joins Jenni to discuss female friendship, community, motherhood and the depiction of working class women on screen. The Domestic Abuse Bill 2020 is currently making its way through Parliament, and will reach the House of Lords by the end of July. For the first time there will be a statutory definition of domestic abuse. The Centre for Women’s Justice is asking for an amendment to the Bill, to create a free-standing offence of non-fatal strangulation or asphyxiation. Nicole Jacobs, the first domestic abuse commissioner for England and Wales, explains why she is supporting them. Professor Linda Scott’s book "The Double X Economy" describes how women are excluded from the global economy in myriad ways, in both developing and developed countries. She claims that the global economy's wealth would be £160 trillion higher if the gender pay gap were closed. Linda explains how empowering women economically could not only resolve gender equality but also help address many of humankind’s most pressing problems. And there are a record number of women in employment – and that includes women slowly but surely increasing their presence in senior management positions and professions that have traditionally been dominated by men. But has ‘being in the room’ really led to changes in attitudes towards women’s capabilities? Or is gender bias still alive and well? Jenni is joined by Professor Michelle Ryan, the author of a new study about gender bias from the University of Exeter and Carina White who works in sports marketing.

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