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Women's Hour

'Up Lit', Take Back ConTROLL, Women in US Politics, Tanya Moodie

Uplifting stories about kindness and community are in vogue. Think bestsellers like Joanna Cannon's The Trouble with Goats and Sheep, Ruth Hogan's The Keeper of Lost Things and the massive hit of last year, Gail Honeyman's Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine. Gail Honeyman and Libby Page, author of The Lido discuss. Woman's Hour has brought together four women who've been abused online and is following their journey to take back conTROLL. Today we hear Charlotte's story. She's a barrister and 29 years old. In 2015 she found herself at the centre of a sexism row. A record number of women in America are running for political office this year - 309 so far, a 90% increase on 2016. But after Hillary's defeat at the last election is America ready to elect more women and what needs to be done to make the possibility of a female President a reality? Rasheeda Speaking is a dark comedy looking at racism in the workplace, white guilt and manipulation. Actor Tanya Moodie who plays the receptionist in a wealthy Chicago hospital joins Jane. Presenter: Jane Garvey Producer: Lucinda Montefiore Editor: Karen Dalziel.

Weekend Woman's Hour: Tina the Musical, Rape Trials and the Court of Public Opinion

Phyllida Lloyd, the director, on the challenges of a staging a musical biography as Tina the Musical opens in London. It stars Adrienne Warren as soul icon Tina Turner. In July 2014 Jane talked to a woman we named 'Helen' who was taking part in a pilot project in London called Pause. It supports women who've had multiple children taken into care to try and break the cycle by using long-acting contraception and gives helps them address underlying issues like addiction, poor mental health and abuse. Four years later, Jane meets 'Helen' to hear how she's getting on In the wake of movements like #MeToo and #IBelieveHer, Baroness Helena Kennedy QC and the Chair of the Criminal Bar Association Angela Rafferty discuss concerns that legal outcomes in rape and sexual assault cases may be undermined by public opinion. Is it possible for any woman to live up to expectations and be a good mother? We hear from Jacqueline Rose, Professor of Humanities at Birkbeck and author of 'Mothers, An Essay on Love and Cruelty'. We speak to Eve Myles, the star of the S4C hit drama series Keeping Faith which is set in Wales. Eve plays Faith Howells, whose life is turned upside down when her husband Evan mysteriously disappears. Award winning actor Kathleen Turner has starred in films like Body Heat & Romancing the Stone. Now she's in a one woman cabaret style show called Finding My Voice singing songs from the Great American Song Book and telling stories from her life. She tells us what Hollywood was like in the 80s. On social media, anyone has the ability to create a persona that suits them. But what happens when this becomes the biggest part of their identity? Vlogger Nia Pettitt and comedian Bella Younger discuss how to escape an online persona. In our series Take Back ConTROLL, we follow the stories of women who have been shamed online. Charley found out that her step-brother had posted pictures of her on a US porn website. She tells Emma Barnett how she felt when she saw the images. And Folk-pop girl band Stealing Sheep p

Sammy Woodhouse, Abortion Pills, Ageing

Sammy Woodhouse is campaigning for a change in the law to pardon child sex abuse survivors for crimes committed while they were being groomed. Sammy was abused from the age of 14 in Rotherham. She joins Jane to talk about her campaign and how she has regained control of her life, as told in her book 'Just A Child'. The Welsh government said women having an early medical abortion should be allowed to take a second pill at home, not in a clinic. It would bring Wales into line with what happens in Scotland. How likely is the same change to take place in England? Labour AM Jenny Rathbone is joined by clinical abortion lead Dr Louise Massey. The comedian Jenny Eclair shared her frustration this week about beauty products aimed at older women. She believes there is a 'whispering conspiracy' against older women to look younger and that women of a certain age are only valued by their looks. Does she have a point? Jenny Eclair joins Jane to discuss along with Trinny Woodall, who has founded her own makeup brand, 'Trinny London'. In July 2014 Jane talked to a woman we named 'Helen' who was taking part in a pilot project in London called Pause. The idea was that women who had had multiple children taken into care could try and break the cycle by using long-acting contraception and with a key worker address underlying issues like addiction, poor mental health and abuse. Four years later, Jane meets 'Helen' to hear how she's getting on.

Tina the Musical, Take Back ConTROLL, Stealing Sheep, Domestic Abuse

Tina the Musical has opened in London. Phyllida Lloyd, the director, joins Jenni to discuss the challenges of a staging a musical biography and finding Adrienne Warren, the young, relatively unknown actor singer who is playing the soul icon Tina Turner. In our series Take Back ConTROLL, we are following the stories of women who have been shamed online and are working with a London advertising agency, Mother, to reclaim their identity. Jackie is 33 and a teacher. She tweeted Katie Hopkins and lived to regret it when it blew up out of control. Jackie explained to Emma Barnett how she coped with going viral. Jenni meets the folk-pop girl band Stealing Sheep and they perform a new single. Should employers be trained in how to spot domestic abuse amongst their staff? The charity Safe Lives which carries out research on domestic abuse is launching a campaign to involve employers in the lives of their employees. It's proposed that employers should be trained in how to spot signs of domestic abuse in people who work for them and then help them sort things out. But should an employee's private life remain private at work? Karen Jackson is a lawyer who specialises in discrimination at work. Penny East is head of communications at Safe Lives. Presenter: Jenni Murray.

Parenting: Alex Jones, Mothers

Returning to work after baby number one can be a traumatic experience for some mothers – and a welcome break for others. Jenni is joined by One Show presenter Alex Jones who took three months maternity leave and has been back at work for almost a year now, Woman’s Hour listener and teacher Laura Pearl who emailed the programme to say she is preparing to return to work full-time after the Easter holidays and Elizabeth Gardiner, Legal rights adviser for Working Families and an employment solicitor. What does it mean to be a mother today? How much does society both idealise and scapegoat mothers? Is it possible for any woman to live up to expectations and be a good mother? Jenni is joined by Jacqueline Rose, Professor of Humanities at Birkbeck and author of 'Mothers, An Essay on Love and Cruelty' to talk about the role we expect mothers to perform in the world. Presenter: Jenni Murray

Sprinter twins Shannon and Cheriece Hylton

Many of us will be familiar with sibling rivalry, but probably not on a level experienced by 21 year-old twins Shannon and Cheriece Hylton. They are both professional sprinters-Shannon runs the 200m and Cheriece the 400m, and they have their sights firmly set on competing in Tokyo in 2020. They join Jenni to talk about how they balance their studies with training and what it's like to be managed by Sir Andy Murray. Today the charity Changing Faces launches a Hate Crime campaign (funded by the Home Office) to stop abuse against people with disfigurements. Their research has found that only 30% of those that have experienced a hate crime reported the incident to the police. And few believe the police would deal with it effectively. Their anecdotal evidence also shows that women with disfigurements tend to be more of a target for abuse than men. Jenni speaks to Victoria Wright and Henrietta Spalding, Head of Advocacy at the charity Changing Faces. Five years ago in September, four men were found guilty of a fatal gang rape on a bus in Delhi. The case caused riots and the Indian government started a process of looking at laws surrounding sexual violence. But for girls and women in the country, the threat of harassment and assault remains. A cultural reluctance to talk openly can make it hard to share. Yet there are pockets of change. Reporter, Catherine Carr went to visit a new group set up in the rural district of Orissa. Here women are encouraged to speak up. They have never spoken publicly like this before. What does it mean to be a mother today? How much does society both idealise and scapegoat mothers? Is it possible for any woman to live up to expectations and be a good mother? We hear from Jacqueline Rose, Professor of Humanities at Birkbeck and author of 'Mothers, An Essay on Love and Cruelty' to talk about the role we expect mothers to perform in the world.

Take Back ConTROLL, Louise Candlish, Rape Trials and the Court of Public Opinion

Two rugby players have had their contracts terminated after they were cleared of rape in a trial which has sparked what many have described as Northern Ireland's '#Me Too moment'. In the wake of movements like #MeToo and #IBelieveHer we discuss whether is it a concern that legal outcomes in rape and sexual assault cases may be undermined by public opinion? "I wanted to write a Gone Girl for the property obsessed," says author Louise Candlish. And she's done just that with her latest book, Our House, in which the main character arrives home to find a removals van outside her house, her belongings gone and a stranger standing on her doorstep. Louise joins Jane to talk about property obsession and the lies and twists in her twelfth novel. Take Back ConTROLL - that's what a group of women are trying to do after being abused online. Here at Woman's Hour we brought these four women together with a London advertising agency, Mother, to see if together they could come up with a campaign that would help them reclaim their identity online and find a solution for this growing social problem. Emma Barnett went to meet them and over the next few weeks you will hear Charley, Jackie, Charlotte and Kelly all share their experiences. Today it's Charley. The Australian actress and screenwriter Daisy Aitkens joins Jane to discuss her new film - You, Me and Him. It tells the story of lesbian couple Olivia and Alex. Through a combination of covert fertility treatment and a drunken assignation with a male neighbour, both women find themselves pregnant at the same time.

Eve Myles, Kathleen Turner, Online personas, Cat Colvin

The drama series Keeping Faith set in Wales stars Eve Myles as Faith Howells, whose life is turned upside down when her husband Evan mysteriously disappears. The series first broadcast on S4C has proved a record-breaker on the BBC iPlayer. Award winning actor Kathleen Turner has starred in films like Body Heat, Romancing the Stone and is the voice of Jessica Rabbit. Now she's in a one woman cabaret style show called Finding My Voice singing songs from the Great American Song Book and telling stories from her life. A week ago a claim was filed in a court in Washington which stated that the journalist Marie Colvin was assassinated by the Assad regime in 2012. This is the first war crimes related case against Syria to reach court in the United States and is being brought by her sister Cat. Cat Colvin tells us about her fight to find out what really happened to her sister. On social media, anyone has the ability to create a persona that suits them. But what happens when this becomes the biggest part of an individual's identity? What does it take to take back control? Nia Pettitt, known online to her thousands of followers as 'Nia the Light', is a natural hair and fashion vlogger. Nia became well-known for her big, curly hair but after worrying that her hair had become the most, and only, important thing about her, she decided to cut it really short. Bella Younger is a comedian, but to her online fans she's known as 'Deliciously Stella' - a parody of healthy lifestyle bloggers. Bella found the pressure of living up to the Stella persona too much, and she's just come back from an online hiatus.

Weekend Woman's Hour: GRRRL, Ruth Jones, Rose Tremain

Three members of the band GRRRL perform their track 'Wissi'. How productive are investigations into current and historical child sex abuse? Do they help victims? Ruth Jones best known for her screenwriting talks about her debut novel Never Greener. Twitter went crazy last week when someone suggested a challenge - describe yourself the way a male author would and lots of references to breasts, tight trousers and curves ensued - so how well do men create female characters? Dr Jo Toovey tells us why she's proposed a motion at the annual conference of the Association of Teachers and Lecturers, asking for more research into the identification and support of female students with neurodiversity. Plus, Rose Tremain talks about her r first work of non-fiction, Rosie: Scenes from a Vanished Life and explains why she's decided to write about her childhood And when it comes to wedding planning how do you make sure you get what you really want? Presenter; Jenni Murray Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed Editor: Beverley Purcell.

Women jockeys in The Grand National, Louise Martin, Men writing female characters, Bump, Birth and Beyond.

Irish Referendum: The Eighth Amendment of the Irish Constitution says that the life of a mother and the life of an unborn foetus is the same. This means that abortion is currently illegal in the Republic of Ireland with one exception: if the mother's life is at risk. In six weeks time Irish citizens will have a chance to vote on whether to repeal the Eighth Amendment. Ailbhe Conneely, political reporter for RTE talks to Jenni Murray about the atmosphere ahead of the referendum. The first female President of the Commonwealth Games Federation, Louise Martin joins Jenni to discuss her path to leading the organisation which has been going under different guises for 88 years and her commitment to achieving medal equality for men and women. With the closing ceremony this Sunday, what does the future hold for the Games and why are they important? Is this finally the year that a woman jockey wins The Grand National? Katie Walsh, Rachael Blackmore and Bryony Frost will be racing on Saturday and all of them are tipped to do well. BBC Racing Reporter Gina Harding joins Jenni from the course at Aintree to discuss their prospects. Another in the mini-series Bump, Birth and Beyond where Woman's Hour listeners Charlotte Dore, Rowan Lawton, Laura Lang and Jen Barratt share their birth stories with reporter Abby Hollick. Today, is anyone thinking about sex, the impact of a newborn on relationships, and what about getting advice from strangers? A recent challenge on twitter, 'describe yourself like a male author would' went viral and sparked an online debate about whether there is there an absence of well-rounded female characters written by men. Jenni is joined by writer and journalist Rhiannon Lucy Cosslett, and author and former Agony Uncle Mike Gayle to discuss.

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