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Women's Hour

Weekend Woman's Hour: Nigel Slater, Sexual harassment, Celebrating real-life role models

Nigel Slater is one of Britain's most influential food writers and cooks. His new book The Christmas Chronicles is a collection of notes, stories and recipes for midwinter. Will the last few months prove a watershed moment for sexual harassment? The founder of Everyday Sexism Laura Bates, activist and writer Bea Campbell, academic and broadcaster Emma Dabiri and Sarah Baxter deputy editor of the Sunday Times discuss. This year's Royal Institution Christmas Lecturer is Sophie Scott, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at University College London. Sophie discusses the theme of language and communication and debunks the common myths around women's brains. Real-life female role models are being celebrated in books for younger readers with some runaway success stories. What makes someone a convincing role model? Space expert and author Libby Jackson and Dr Hetta Howes, a lecturer in medieval literature at the University of London, discuss. An online shop has released images of plus-size tights being stretched out over skinny models' bodies to demonstrate their size. One picture shows a model standing fully in one leg of the tights. Hear reactions from the plus size model Olivia Campbell and fashion blogger Bethany Rutter. For some women, it's clear that having children is part of their future; for others it's definitely not. But what about when you're just not sure? Comedy writer Sian Harries and dating and relationships coach Katherine Baldwin discuss ambivalence towards becoming a mother. Author Nina Stibbe's new book is timely An Almost Perfect Christmas. Why is Christmas such a source of amusement for her? She joins Jane to discuss the highs and lows of Christmas jollity and fun.

Bump, Birth and Beyond, Sexual Harassment, Men's Fashion

In what could be the first Woman's Hour baby group we're launching Bump, Birth and Beyond. A series following the experiences of four pregnant women who're all due to give birth around the same time. In an honest conversation about pregnancy, birth and expectations, our reporter Abby Hollick, who is herself 33 weeks pregnant, talks to Charlotte Dore, Rowan Lawton, Jen Barratt and Laura Lang. Will the last few months prove a watershed moment for sexual harassment? Jenni will be joined by the founder of Everyday Sexism Laura Bates, activist and writer Bea Campbell, academic and broadcaster Emma Dabiri and Sarah Baxter deputy editor of the Sunday Times to deliberate how lasting any change might be. The period gang drama Peaky Blinders draws to a close next week but the look of Cillian Murphy's lead character Thomas Shelby is far from over. From overcoats and three piece suits to peaked caps, the trend of 1920s Birmingham is fast making an impact on the high streets of 2017. We discuss the show's influence on men's fashion.

Poet and writer Nan Shepherd; The Fix: Women and Addiction; Siblings and their partners.

In the 1930's Nan Shepherd was one of Scotland's best known poets and writers, but her masterpiece The Living Mountain languished unpublished in a drawer and she died before it became successful. Jenni speaks to Charlotte Peacock who has written her biography about how the love of the mountains and landscape of Scotland inspired her writing and has led to her being pictured on the RBS £5 note. Keaton Jones is an American schoolboy who received an outpouring of support after his Mum posted a video online of him crying and discussing the bullying he faces at school. His family are now facing a backlash following allegations they've been asking for money and have racist views. They deny this. Jenni discusses what parents should and shouldn't be sharing online. An online shop has released images of plus-size tights being stretched out over skinny models' bodies to demonstrate their size. One picture shows a model standing fully in one leg of the tights. We'll be looking at its impact. Plus as part of The Fix: Women and Addiction Milly Chowles visits a women-only treatment centre. What is it about women's experiences of addiction, treatment and recovery that might make a single-sex space for some women with addiction problems? And how do you cope when your sibling changes after meeting a new partner? And what if you don't like them? Jenni is joined by clinical psychologist and author of Siblings Linda Blair.

Nigel Slater and Dark Chocolate Spice Cake, Teenage Parties, Sophie Scott;

Currently, women who ask for an early medical abortion (EMA) in the first nine weeks of pregnancy must take two drugs, one or two days apart, and by law both must be taken at a clinic. Professor Lesley Regan, President of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists, has said that women in England and Wales should be allowed to take the second of two 'abortion pills' at home. Jenni is joined by Professor Regan to explain her proposals, and BBC Health Correspondent, Catherine Burns. Nigel Slater is one of Britain's most influential food writers and cooks. His new book 'The Christmas Chronicles' is a collection of notes, stories and recipes for midwinter. At the heart of the book is Christmas with its fables, folklore and food. Nigel is in the studio with a festive Dark Chocolate Spice Cake. This year's Royal Institution Christmas Lecturer is Sophie Scott, Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at University College London. The three part series is titled 'The language of life' and will be broadcast on BBC Four over Xmas. Sophie discusses the theme of language and communication as well as debunking the common myths around women's brains. We've all heard the horror stories of teenage parties gone wrong - an open invitation posted on Facebook, 100s of unknown children turning up with drink and drugs, the police called in the early hours and a hefty bill for the unaware parents to pick up. So, how do you plan for a teenager's first party at home? How do you manage a group of children many of whom you may never have met? How do you balance trust and responsibility with being incredibly sensible and should you also insist on being there? Journalist, Anna Burnside and the writer, Kathy Lette, both mothers of two, discuss. Presenter: Jenni Murray Producer: Kirsty Starkey.

Parenting: Teenage parties

We’ve all heard the horror stories of teenage parties gone wrong. An open invitation posted on Facebook, 100s of unknown children turning up with drink and drugs, the police called in the early hours and a hefty bill for the unaware parents to pick up. So, how do you plan for a teenager’s first party at home? How do you manage a group of children many of whom you may never have met? How to you balance trust and responsibility with being incredibly sensible and should you always insist on being there? Jenni is joined by the Daily journalist Anna Burnside and the writer Kathy Lette, both mothers of two.

Addiction, Nina Stibbe, Outsourcing parenting, Russian heroines

Author Nina Stibbe's new book is timely 'An Almost Perfect Christmas'. Why is Christmas such a source of amusement for her? And what is at the root of her turkey phobia? She joins Jane to discuss her observations of the highs and lows of Christmas jollity and fun. In the latest in our series The Fix: Women and Addiction Milly Chowles meets Georgia whose addictions took hold at University. By the age of 25 she had pancreatitis due to her drinking and was having regular seizures. In a 'dry house' to recover she had a relationship and became pregnant, though she'd been told that the damage to her body meant she was infertile. Having a baby, she says, has saved her and given her a reason to stay sober. In the centenary year of the Russian Revolution, a mini-series about three women whose radical ideas shaped the events of 1917 and continued to reverberate in Russia and around the world. Nadezhda Krupskaya is our third and last woman. Viv Groskop, author of The Anna Karenina Fix, Life Lessons from Russian Literature describes a committed revolutionary, passionate about education who also happened to be Lenin's wife. Outsourcing parenting: when parents are working long hours which parenting tasks are acceptable to ask someone else to do? What about potty training, sleeping through the night, learning to ride a bike, trouble with homework? Jane speaks to Nana Akua health journalist, presenter and mum of two children - who says she would definitely consider outsourcing some tasks second time around, and to Laverne Antrobus, Child Psychologist at the Tavistock Clinic in London.

Rohingya women, Celebrating real-life role models, Being ambivalent about having children

With hundreds of thousands of Rohingya Muslims fleeing Myanmar for Bangladesh, we talk to foreign correspondent Christina Lamb about conditions facing women and children in the refugee camps, amid reports of widespread rape and killings. The Queen's Young Leaders awards recognise the work of young people across the Commonwealth to change lives in their communities. We talk to one of the two UK-based winners Leanne Armitage who won her award for the work she's done to inspire those from disadvantaged backgrounds and ethnic minorities to enter the world of medicine. Paul Shanks suffered from mental health issues before killing himself at the age of 51, leaving his wife and seven children. Film-maker Lucy Cohen has turned their story into a Netflix documentary about how the family learn to cope. Vikie Shanks discusses the impact his death has had on their children and how they've tried to understand their father's mental state. Real-life female role models are being celebrated in books for younger readers with some runaway success stories. So how important are these books and what makes someone a convincing role model? Space expert and author Libby Jackson and Dr Hetta Howes, a lecturer in medieval literature at the University of London, discuss. For some women, it's clear that having children is part of their future; for others it's definitely not. But what about when you're just not sure? Comedy writer Sian Harries and dating and relationships coach Katherine Baldwin discuss ambivalence towards becoming a mother. Presenter: Jane Garvey Producer: Anne Peacock.

Weekend Woman's Hour: Christine Keeler, Nursing, Women and Comedy, Vanessa Kirby

Christine Keeler, the former model at the centre of the Profumo affair that shocked politics in the 1960s has died. We reflect on her life with the writers Amanda Coe and Anne Chisholm. Vanessa Kirby talks about her role playing Princess Margaret in 'The Crown'. New figures show that although a near-record number of places were offered on nursing courses this year, both applications and acceptances were down. Alison Leary, Professor of Healthcare and Workforce Modelling at London South Bank University and Lara Carmona, Director of Policy and Current Affairs , Royal College of Nursing discuss why nursing has become an unattractive option for prospective students. Three years ago the BBC said broadcasting a comedy panel show without a woman was not acceptable. Why are there still so few female comedians on our screens? Lecturer in comedy writing and performance at Salford University Lisa Moore and comedian Tiff Stevenson discuss. The FGM campaigner Nimco Ali discusses whether Somaliland can really become the first country in Africa to eradicate the practice of female genital mutilation. What's the point of an office Christmas Party? Freelance journalist Helen Nianias and former managing director of Slingshot Sponsorship Jackie Fast talk about navigating festive work events. Alice is one of six people Newsbeat followed for six months as part of Radio 1 and 1Xtra's 'My Mind and Me' campaign. They wanted to share their stories to reveal what it's really like to live with a mental health condition. Alice is a twenty-seven year old mother of two who has schizophrenia. Presenter: Jenni Murray Producer Dianne McGregor.

Vanessa Kirby in The Crown

She had the world's most famous sister, was forbidden to marry the man she loved and became a fashion icon for her generation. Princess Margaret is a unique role to play and one the actress Vanessa Kirby feels has been a true gift. Vanessa talks to Jenni about what it's like to play such an iconic figure and what's in store for her during season two of The Crown, released on Netflix today. A YouGov poll has revealed the extent to which potential pregnancy can work against women when it comes to being hired. The survey found that nearly one in five male HR decision-makers, and one in ten of their female equivalents, are reluctant to hire young women who might have children. Carole Easton, chief executive of the Young Women's Trust who commissioned the survey, talks about the findings and their recommendations. Alice is one of six people Newsbeat followed for six months as part of Radio 1 and 1Xtra's 'My Mind and Me' campaign. They wanted to share their stories to reveal what it's really like to live with a mental health condition. A 27 year old mother of two who has schizophrenia, Alice is passionate about speaking out about the condition and talks about why, with the right help and support there's no reason why you can't fulfil your potential. This Christmas, Theatre Royal Bath presents Little Mermaid in the Egg - a reimagined version that couldn't be further away from the original Hans Christen Andersen fairy tale. This interpretation is written from a feminist perspective with a same-sex love story. Writer Bea Roberts discusses her strong female protagonist. With sexual harassment allegations dominating the headlines, how should we be talking to our children about their sexual rights and responsibilities? In a short series with Relationships and Sex Education Specialist Rachel Fitzsimmons, we discuss how to have this conversation with children of different ages. Today Rachel discusses how to talk to teenagers. Presenter: Jenni Murray Producer: Kirsty Starkey.

Office parties, Lilya Brik, The Fix: Women and Addiction

What's the point of an office Christmas party? New figures show that 1 out of 5 people have a romantic encounter at one, but besides finding love, they can be team-bonding experiences, an opportunity to network, or just plain awkward. Freelance journalist Helen Nianias and former managing director Jackie Fast discuss how to navigate festive work events. One in five young people are obese at age 14 says a new report from the Millennium Cohort Study. The director of the study, Professor Emla Fitzsimons and Dr Ronny Cheung, spokesperson for the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health discuss the reasons behind such high rates and the ramifications for the health of the next generation. In the second of our series about Russian revolutionary women, writer Viv Groskop talks about Lilya Brik who was born in 1891 and trained as an architect in Moscow. Married to one poet and the lover and muse of another, she was so admired for her beauty that artists such as Matisse or Chagall queued to paint her. In the latest in our series The Fix about women and addiction, 'Sam' describes being introduced to drugs by her husband - a joint habit she later supported through prostitution - what got her through it, her life in recovery and being hopeful about the future, no longer in a toxic relationship. Presenter: Jenni Murray Producer: Anne Peacock Reporter: Milly Chowles.

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