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Women's Hour

Yotam Ottolenghi, Long Covid and Women, Breast Cancer Screening and Talking to Children about Death

Flavour is the third instalment in Yotam Ottolenghi’s Plenty series which celebrates the infinite potential of vegetables. Along with co-author and recipe developer Ixta Belfrage they explore techniques and processes such as infusing and charring which brings out the full flavour of the vegetable. They join Jenni to talk about how to Cook the Perfect Spicy Mushroom Lasagne. We now know that tens of thousands of people in the UK are living with Long Covid – meaning that they have not yet recovered from the effects of the virus, even if their infection was relatively mild, and happened months ago. Symptoms vary but can include breathlessness and fatigue. You might have heard presenter Adam Rutherford yesterday on Radio 4 talking about his own experience of it, and looking at the growing body of science around the condition. A picture is also now emerging of how the condition is affecting women. The Long Covid Support group on Facebook has 23,000 members in the UK and 75% of them are women. Lesley Macniven is one of the group’s campaigners and a gender inequality researcher by trade. She joins Jenni from Edinburgh. It is estimated that nearly one million women in the UK missed their routine mammogram breast screening programme appointments due to Covid-19. This is according to figures from the charity Breast Cancer Now. Their Chief Executive Baroness Delyth Morgan outlines their concerns and what needs to be done to deal with a backlog of cases. In our family secrets series Jo Morris speaks to a woman we are calling Liz, who found out her father’s fifty year old secret at the worst possible time, when she was grieving for him. Isabel Thomas has written more than 150 books about science and nature for young audiences, including Moth, which won the 2020 AAAS Prize for Excellence in Science Books. She has now written Fox - A Circle of Life Story – a picture book inspired by her own experiences of talking to her three children about death, and of having her only parent die at a young age. The book gives

Cherry Groce; Gender Recognition Act; Should parents be friends with their children?

On 28 September 1985, Lee Lawrence’s mother Cherry Groce was wrongly shot by police during a raid on her Brixton home. The bullet shattered her spine and she never walked again. Soon after it was reported – wrongly - that Cherry Groce was dead, and two days of rioting took place in Brixton. All this was witnessed by 11-year-old Lee. He became his mother’s carer. After a doctor questioned the cause of his mother’s death in 2011 Lee campaigned fiercely for an inquest, a chance to find out what really happened the day his family’s life was turned upside down. Lee joins Jane tomorrow to talk about his mother, his life as a carer, his fight to get the police to recognise their wrongdoing and his ongoing commitment to challenge racism and fight for justice. The government has announced it will not go ahead with a change to the Gender Recognition Act which would have allowed trans men and women to self identify rather than go through a medical diagnosis to change their gender. The Equalities and Human Rights Commission has said it was a ‘missed opportunity’ but women's rights groups have applauded the decision as a ‘victory for fairness and common sense’. Jane Garvey hears from two of the women who’ve been campaigning on this issue, Dr Heather Peto who is Co-Chair of Labour’s LGBT+ group and Dr Nicola Williams from the group Fair Play for Women. The 2020 Woman’s Hour Power List is looking for women who are making a significant difference to the health of our planet. But that power doesn’t have to be held on boards or by leading international organisations. Zoë Randle, the Senior Surveys Officer for Butterfly Conservation, tells Jane about the hugely important role played by hundreds of thousands of volunteers – who are turning their love of nature into hard data that directly influences conservation policy in the UK. Do you think there should be clearly defined parent/child relationship? Or maybe you think of your family as more of a team or that your child is like a friend. If you’ve been watching the new Netf

The Government's Early Years review, Andrea McLean, Celebrating 'alonement'

The government is carrying out a review into how to improve health outcomes for babies and children from disadvantaged backgrounds. The Early Years development review will look at the critical first two and a half years of life which has a significant impact on the physical health, mental health and opportunity throughout life. We hear from the government's Early Years adviser Andrea Leadsom MP. In August we spoke to Alexandra Wilson about her book “In Black and White” - breaking down barriers of race and class to become a barrister. Last week she tweeted how she’d been mistaken for a defendant three times in one day in court. She joins Jane. Live, learn and thrive – that’ what Andrea McLean wants us to be able to achieve with the help of her new book “This Girl is on Fire”. In it she shares her own experiences of overcoming toxic relationships, a breakdown and burnout to help us see that we can change ourselves and change our life. There are many terms that are used to describe spending time alone, but most of them have negative connotations. Journalist Francesca Specter has coined the term “alonement” to describe celebrating the time you spend alone. She shares the inspiration behind the term, how it has helped her during lockdown, and how we can all learn the skills of solitude. A new study led by researchers at UCL and York University, Canada, shows that skin to skin contact with a parent reduces how strongly a newborn baby’s brain responds to a painful medical jab. Dr Laura Jones explains. Presenter: Jane Garvey Producer: Dianne McGregor

The Woman's Hour Power List 2020, Mary McAleese, Known Donations, Chutney

The 2020 Woman’s Hour Power List is ‘Our Planet’ - the search is on for 30 women based in the UK who are making a significant positive contribution to the environment. Emma Howard Boyd, the chair of the Environment Agency, and Flo Headlam, a horticulturalist and garden designer are two of the judges. Mary McAleese was twice president of Ireland, studied canon law when her term ended and, to the surprise of many, as she has a deep personal faith, spoke out against misogyny in the global Catholic Church. Her autobiography is called ‘Here’s the Story : A Memoir.’ There’s been a rise in websites and Facebook groups offering Known Donation, where a person seeking to conceive uses a sperm or egg donation from someone they know, or got to know before the treatment. We hear from Sarah Norcross, Director of the Progress Educational Trust; Erika Tranfield, the mother of a donor-conceived child from a known donor; and Natasha Fox, a donor-conceived adult who does not know the identity of her biological father. Emily Hunt was filmed when she was asleep in a hotel room. A man was convicted of voyeurism, but it took her several years to secure that conviction and she decided to waive her right to anonymity to fight her case. But what do you gain and what do you lose if you do give up your anonymity? Jenni hears from Emily and Leona O’Callaghan who did the same: she waived her right to anonymity when the man who abused her as a child was on trial and then convicted. She also hears from “Rebecca” who doesn’t want to waive her anonymity. She’s pressing the CPS to prosecute a man who she says attacked and raped her. When actor Shobna Gulati’s mum was diagnosed with dementia in 2017, she was already spending the majority of her time caring for her. Her mother has since died, and she’s written a memoir about her family and her mum’s illness called Remember Me? Discovering my mother as she lost her memory. It is chutney and pickle season and a great opportunity to use up your remaining fruit and veg. Food historian Lizzie Coll

The Windrush generation, Jess Gillam, Waiving your right to anonymity

Windrush campaigner, Paulette Wilson’s brave decision to speak to Amelia Gentleman about the immigration issues she was facing with the Home Office was crucial in exposing the Windrush scandal. In her book, The Windrush Betrayal, Gentleman tells the full story of her investigation. Campaigner, Glenda Caesar was also caught up in the hostile environment – she came to Britain legally as a three-month-old child and had no reason to think she was not British until she was she was sacked from her job as an NHS administrator. She was one of the first recipients of the first Windrush compensation offers which she rejected as insulting. Lawyer, Jacqueline McKenzie explains why there is such a delay in victims receiving payments. Following her debut album ‘Rise’ which reached No.1 in the UK Classical Chart, award-winning saxophonist Jess Gilliam is back with a new album. She joins us to discuss diversity in classical music and advice for playing an instrument during lockdown. At the beginning of the month, you may have come across the story of Emily Hunt. She was filmed when she was asleep in a hotel room. A man was convicted of voyeurism, but it took her several years to secure that conviction and Emily decided to waive her right to anonymity to fight her case. But what do you gain and what do you lose if you do give up being anonymous? Joining us is Emily. Also Leona O’Callaghan who did the same: she waived her right to anonymity when the man who abused her as a child was on trial and then convicted. And someone who wants to be called “Rebecca” who doesn’t want to waive her anonymity. She’s pressing the CPS to prosecute a man who she says attacked and raped her. Presenter: Jenni Murray Producer: Lucinda Montefiore

Alison Steadman, Mary McAleese, The Woman's Hour Power List 2020, Chutney.

The award-winning actor Alison Steadman joins Jenni to discuss her latest projects. ’23 Walks’ is a film telling a love story in later life, and ‘Life’ is a new BBC1 drama set in Manchester, and follows the stories of the residents of a large house divided into four flats. It explores love, loss, birth, death, the ordinary, the extraordinary and everything in between. Mary McAleese was President of Ireland twice. When she finished her second term, she turned her sights on the global Catholic Church, and having the credibility of a doctorate in Canon Law behind her, she spoke out against what she saw as the misogyny within it. She did it despite having a deep personal faith that goes back to her childhood. Mary was born in Belfast in the 1950s; witnessed the Troubles as they started and how they went onto to wreak havoc and pain on both sides. She became a barrister even though it wasn’t expected of a woman: especially a woman from a working class background. She’s brought out her autobiography - Here’s The Story. The 2020 Woman’s Hour Power List is all about ‘Our Planet’ - and the search is on for 30 women based in the UK who are making a significant positive contribution to the environment. This could be through working in conservation or running a local anti-plastic campaign – but there are also less obvious sectors in which women are making a huge difference. Emma Howard Boyd, the chair of the Environment Agency, and Flo Headlam, a horticulturalist and garden designer talk to Jenni about their less conventional journeys into green careers – and highlight the lesser known areas where women are driving change. With Autumn setting in, it’s chutney and pickle season and a great opportunity to use up your remaining fruit and veg. Food historian Lizzie Collingham explains the history behind these tasty relishes. Presented by Jenni Murray Producer: Louise Corley Editor: Karen Dalziel

Women's football; Black women running for office in the US; Sue Miller's novel Monogamy

Why are the world’s best female footballers signing for English clubs? In the past few weeks some of the world’s best female footballers have signed for clubs in the Women’s Super League, highlighting a power shift in women’s football globally and setting up an enticing season, which will be watched, at least remotely, by more fans than ever before. The new arrivals include five of the US World Cup-winning team, most notably Alex Morgan at Tottenham Hotspur, who scored one of the goals that knocked England out of the 2019 World Cup. To discuss the women’s game and the draw to English clubs, Jenni is joined by BBC Women’s Sport Reporter, Jo Currie, and Kristine Leine, Defender for Reading FC Women. New data from a parliamentary committee suggests the problem of poor body image has increased during lockdown. The social media survey by the Women and Equalities committee is being published today as they start hearing evidence from experts about body image on areas such as who’s at risk, the impact on mental health and issues such digital editing and image filtering online. Negative body image can have a serious effect on self esteem and lead to depression, eating disorders and the use of medication such as diet pills, laxatives and steroids. The committee’s chair Caroline Nokes talks about what the inquiry hopes to achieve. This year at least 266 women of colour - 175 Democrat and 91 Republican - are major-party candidates for the U.S. Congress, setting new records for the 2020 elections. We hear from Candace Valenzuela standing for office in Dallas, Texas and Desiree Tims in Dayton, Ohio. Kimberly Peeler-Allen, a co-founder of Higher Heights, an organisation supporting Black women into elected office, joins them. Sue Miller’s new novel Monogamy explores a long relationship and complicated grief. Annie and Graham have a loving relationship that has lasted for decades but when the unthinkable happens Annie has to re-evaluate everything.

The Woman's Hour Power List 2020, US Congresswoman Ilhan Omar, Known Donation

Today we launch the Woman’s Hour Power List 2020 - Our Planet. We will be looking for 30 women based in the UK who are making a significant positive contribution to the environment or the sustainability of our planet. It will showcase inspirational initiatives and stories that are bringing about real change at all levels of society – from influencing global policy and changing human behaviour, to inventing eco-friendly products, spearheading scientific research, volunteering in community gardens, and inspiring a deep love of the natural world. Jane is joined by two of the judges - Lucy Siegle and Zunaira Malik - to discuss who we’re looking for and how listeners can tell us who they think should be in the running. In 2016 Ilhan Omar became the United States’ first Somali-American lawmaker, joining the Minnesota House of Representatives as a Democrat. Two years later she In became one of the first two Muslim women elected to US Congress. She’s 37 and has described herself as ‘America’s hope and the President’s nightmare.’ In May this year George Floyd, an unarmed black man was killed by police in her home city of Minneapolis, sparking protests across the world. Her book is This is What America Looks Like: My Journey from Refugee to Congresswoman. There’s been a rise in websites and Facebook groups offering Known Donation in recent years, where a person seeking to conceive uses a sperm or egg donation from someone they know or get to know before the treatment. What’s behind it, and what are the pros and cons of this method of assisted conception? We discuss with Sarah Norcross, Director of the Progress Educational Trust; Erika Tranfield, the mother of a donor-conceived child from a known donor; and Natasha Fox, a donor-conceived adult who does not know the identity of her biological father. Presenter: Jane Garvey Producer: Lucinda Montefiore

Shobna Gulati. British Touring Car driver Jade Edwards. Playground politics. Sarah Brown.

When actor Shobna Gulati’s mum was diagnosed with dementia in 2017, she was already spending the majority of her time caring for her. Their sometimes difficult relationship was tested to the limit, but ultimately she gained a lot from those years spent in her mum’s front room. When she passed away last year she decided to write a book about her family and her mum’s illness called Remember Me? Discovering my mother as she lost her memory. At the weekend Jade Edwards will become the first woman in 13 years to race in the British Touring Car Championship at Silverstone. So why's it taken so long to see another woman on the course? Jade joins us, along with Fiona Leggate, the last female driver who competed back in 2007. Have you been given the silent treatment by another parent at school, or felt excluded from a group of mums? Now the new school year is well underway, playground politics can sometimes extend to the other side of the school gate. Jane discusses coping strategies with counselling psychologist Dr Rachel Allan and Tanith Carey, author of The Friendship Maze and Taming the Tiger Parent. Because of the Covid 19 pandemic up to 10 million children around the world are likely to be permanently excluded from getting an education according to the UK charity Theirworld. It's run by Sarah Brown, wife of the former Prime Minister Gordon Brown. Ahead of a virtual session later today at the UN General Assembly Meeting she talks to Jane about how the charity advocates on global education issues at both a strategic and practical level . Presenter Jane Garvey. Producer Beverley Purcell Photo Credit. The About Studio.

Weekend Woman's Hour - The Feminisation of alcohol marketing, Nudity & Sculptor Bridget McCrum

How does the feminisation of alcohol work? We hear from Carol Emslie a Professor of substance use and misuse at the School of Health and Life Sciences at Glasgow Caledonian University, Kate Baily a podcast host and the co-author of Love Yourself Sober – a self-care guide to alcohol-free living for busy mothers and from Dr Athanasia Daskalopoulou, a Lecturer in Marketing at the University of Liverpool Management School. What are the pros and cons of being naked in front of your children? Rosie Haine, a writer and illustrator whose book is called “It Isn’t Rude to be Nude and Dr Keon West, a psychologist at Goldsmiths, University of London, discuss. Three quarters of black women do not feel the NHS protects them equally. That’s according to the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Human Rights which commissioned a poll on being Black in the UK. We hear from researcher Celine Henry and Harriet Harman MP Chair of the Joint Committee on Human Rights. Julia Gillard, once Prime Minister of Australia, and Dr Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, economist and international development expert from Nigeria and also a woman with experience at the top of the Nigerian politics, have come together to explore women and leadership. They tell us about the book they’ve written together. Bridget McCrum didn’t start her career as a sculptor until she was in her forties. Now at 86 she is still working with stone and in the last 10 years has had more interest in her work than ever - a recent commission sold for 68, 000 pounds. The author Nina Stibbe tells us about winning the Comedy Women in Print Prize with her book ‘Reasons To Be Cheerful’ with chair of the judges Marian Keyes. Presenter: Jenni Murray Producer: Rabeka Nurmahomed Editor: Sarah Crawley

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